The lean-to’s at High Falls. Walk up toward High Falls, bear right where the trail splits (going to the left, you’d walk down toward the falls). Walk further up and you are on the Spring Ridge trail.

Not far from where the Line Shack Trail meets the Panhandle Trail, you’ll find the old Forstmann “line shack.” This is where patrols watching the deer fence (looking for breaks in the fence and for poachers) would meet halfway after walking “the line.” They would meet at the same time each day (apparently mid-day) and stop for a bite to eat.

Inside the Line Shack, built in 1925. The flash on my camera makes it seem newer and neater than it is.

The Line Shack Trail and Panhandle Trail meet twice. This junction is not far above HIgh Falls, along High Falls Brook. Later they meet again near where the Line Shack is located. The Panhandle is not much hiked. It veers far up into the upper reaches of Frost Valley’s property.

Starting at High Falls, take the Spring Ridge trail until it meets the Line Shack trail. Follow that up hill until you can visit the Line Shack. Continue on until it meets Rocky Road trail, which takes you down into camp, along the east side — walk down into the Sequoia area on the west side of Pigeon Brook.

A sign we posted on the Line Shack, encouraging hikers to preserve the old structure.

Along the east end of the Line Shack trail you pass a stand of dying pines. I found them to be very beautiful.

This little guy seems to make his home under and around the Line Shack. We found him sunbathing near the warm rocks of the fire-ring at the Line Shack campsite.

Rocky Road trail—which is for me the most beautiful walk at Frost Valley—comes to a sudden clearing, and there you see Wildcat Mountain on the other side of the valley. Wonderful!

A nice spot along Spring Ridge trail above High Falls, before it turns east and gets quite mucky with the springs that give it its name.

About the Author

Al Filreis

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